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The Classics Laid Bare

(Observations, Oussama Zahr, Performances, Keeping it Local, New York City, Theater) Permanent link

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Derek Jacobi as Lear in Michael Grandage's production, currently at BAM
© Johan Persson

Perhaps the best way to preview Michael Grandage's new production of Don Giovanni, due at the Met this fall, is to see his staging of King Lear, playing at BAM until June 5. The works have some things in common — the necessity of vivid, meaningful ensemble work; a descent into wildness as night falls halfway through the show; and a seminal place in each artist's oeuvre in competition with a sometimes more widely esteemed work (Le Nozze di Figaro, Hamlet). Of course, both protagonists spend a good deal of time with their shirts unbuttoned, too, though for admittedly different reasons.

Don Giovanni and King Lear share a common pitfall, too: they can both fall victim to pageantry. Grandage strips the stage naked for his Lear, leaving rows of planks upon which the action unfolds. The play benefits from quick, seamless transitions between scenes, thanks to the unit set, which puts a burning emphasis on the interaction between characters.

But that doesn't necessarily mean the Don Giovanni will go without eye-popping designs. The Donmar Warehouse, where Grandage is artistic director, has shown another way to humanize a classical work. For its sizzling Broadway production of Mary Stuart from 2009, the battling queens were sumptuously attired in period fashions — a visual feast against a spare background that threw into relief both the costumes and Schiller's ornate language.

Either way, if Grandage brings this kind of depth and humanity to Mozart, Met-goers are in for a real treat. spacer 

OUSSAMA ZAHR

Renée Fleming at Carnegie Hall

(Observations, Oussama Zahr, Performances) Permanent link

On Tuesday evening at Carnegie Hall, at the end of a lovely program of music from fin de siècle Vienna, Renée Fleming thanked her audience for coming out despite the threat of a snowstorm. "I was afraid no one would come," she said, which prompted loud expressions of disbelief, at least from the narcoleptic man in my row. To prove her appreciation, she offered a wish list of encores, including Strauss's "Zeiugnung" and a devastatingly beautiful account of Marietta's lied from Korngold's Die Tote Stadt, complete with effortlessly floated pianissimos. (When she announced the latter, reverential "oh!"s and sighs swept like a wave across the audience.) After a spirited if awkward go at Bernstein's "I Feel Pretty," Fleming sent everyone home with all best wishes for better weather tomorrow, singing Strauss's "Morgen!"

Check out the clip below of Fleming singing Marietta's lied from a 2006 Moscow concert. spacer 

OUSSAMA ZAHR


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